Manor Academy

Achievement, Engagement and Enjoyment.

KS3 Literacy - Reading

There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.

Joseph Brodsky

Reading is a vital skill that all students need to help them pass any examination. Reading is relevant to every single subject area and exam success depends on reading skills. At Manor Academy we have Jubilee Hall – this facility is jam packed with all kinds of books for our students to enjoy. Our librarian Mrs Latimer will also order in any books that our students request and VIVOs are rewarded for her reading club.

There are four types of reading that students at Manor Academy use on a daily basis:

Continuous: This is the first type of reading you learn and involves reading a text from the beginning to the end.

Scanning: You use this type of reading when you are looking for something in particular in a text – this could be a key word or date for example.

Skimming: This type of reading is used when you quickly read a text to get the main ideas.

Close: This is the hardest type of reading and is closely linked to analysis. Students at Manor Academy often refer to ’reading between the lines’. This is the type of reading where students have to work out the answer from a text by looking at a deeper layer of meaning.

Please find below the different areas that students’ reading is assessed on:

AF2

Being able to understand, select and retrieve information from texts, using quotations.

AF3

Being able to deduce and infer information from texts: to ‘read between the lines’ and being able to work things

AF4

To identify and comment on the structure of a text.

AF5

To explain and comment on writers’ use of language.

AF6

To identify and comment on writers’ purposes, viewpoints and consider how texts impact readers.

AF7

To be able to relate texts to their social, cultural and historical traditions.

Top tips for top readers:

Encourage your child to read for at least thirty minutes a day. It has been proven that reading for thirty minutes can have a significant impact on the progress of your child in school.

When reading a text, ask your child to underline any effective vocabulary that they have discovered. If they are unaware of the meaning of a word find out the meaning together by using a paper or online dictionary.

Ask your child to explain how they feel about a text they are reading and to provide textual evidence to back up their points.

If practicing for examinations, advise your child to closely read the exam questions and underline the key words.